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« The GOP and mysterious, unseen, unseeable forces | Main | Sarah Palin as a "crucial turning point"? I think not. »

October 26, 2015

Comments

chapworthy

Creepiest Carson moment yet, in response to Chuck Todd (and stated with the soft-spoken flatness of a Jeffrey Dahmer):

CHUCK TODD:
Do you think that people mistake your soft-spokenness with a lack of energy?

DR. BEN CARSON:
I think so. I have plenty of energy. But, you know, I am soft-spoken. I do have a tendency to be relaxed. I wasn't always like that. There was a time when I was, you know, very volatile. But, you know, I changed.

CHUCK TODD:
When was that?

DR. BEN CARSON:
As a teenager. I would go after people with rocks, and bricks, and baseball bats, and hammers. And, of course, many people know the story when I was 14 and I tried to stab someone. And, you know, fortunately, you know, my life has been changed. And I'm a very different person now.

Anne J

They must be so hypnotized by his sleepy voice, they don't realize the truly psychotic things he says.

Bob

There is a Republican Party, but it's no longer a political party in the generally accepted sense. Beginning in the 1980's it transformed itself into a constantly running PR campaign to win elections. All functioning policy positions without paying sponsors were abandoned or reduced to simulations.

One of the most influential architects of the transformation was Lee Atwater, who went to work for the Reagan administration in 1980. He emphasized techniques such as coded racist language, push-polling, equating Democrats and communists, planting phony reporters at press events, big lies, and so on. By 1988 Rush Limbaugh was on the national scene using more coded language, demonization and big lies, but also including material from wingnut think tanks. His and Atwater's imitators are now legion. To some extent they include all people who identify as Republicans and most who consider themselves conservatives. In this bubble of bullshit, withdrawn from reality, Carson isn't an anomaly in the least.

Peter G

Only after I commented on your previous offering did I realize that I misunderstood it. I get it now. I will offer a harsher metaphor. In the aftermath of the events of 9/11 and the rise of the Truther movement I spent way too much time trying to convince people that grade eleven physics was a poor basis on which to analyze the mode of structural failure of the twin towers. Or Building 7 for that matter. My efforts were pointless but my informed guess correct as born out by the final report on the collapse of these buildings.

When the upper sections of the buildings collapsed they hit the lower sections like a gigantic hammer. The shock waves that propagate throughout the structure move at the speed of sound in steel and concrete. And that's fast. It destroyed the structural integrity of everything it passed through. For a brief moment in time the lower sections of the structures stood as loose assemblages of building materials that collapsed effortlessly under the accumulating and accelerating mass of material descending from above.

That's what the Republican party looks like to me now. It is an edifice in theory only.

Some guy

Quite right. They don't have a real political party, but what they do have is an near-infinite supply of money and a large supply of rubes.

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